Bluebuck – It Was Very Good

Bluebuck
Mounted Bluebuck, Frank Lane – Arkive.org

Bluebuck (Hippotragus leucophaeus)

The Bluebuck or blue antelope was a small antelope indigenous to South Africa. The tallest mounted specimen (there are only four) is nearly four feet at the shoulder with horns that are almost two feet long and curved back toward the animal’s body. The Bluebuck’s coat was a uniform grey-blue color with a white belly. The forehead was brown and darker than the face, its ears were shorter and blunter, not tipped with black; and, it had a darker tail tuft and smaller teeth. It also lacked the contrasting black and white patterns seen on the heads of its relatives. Its mane was not as developed and it lacked the black and white patterns seen in its nearest relatives the roan and sable antelopes.

“Discovered” by Europeans in the 17th century, but already uncommon, the Bluebuck’s range was confined to the southwestern cape of South Africa. Its original entire historic range has been estimated to be only 1,700 square miles. The first published mention of the bluebuck is from 1681, and few descriptions of the animal were written while it existed. The few 18th-century illustrations appear to have been based on stuffed specimens. Hunted by European settlers.

bluebuck
Bluebuck, Allamand, 1778

Due to the small range of the bluebuck at the time of European settlement of the Cape region of South Africa in the 17th and 18th centuries compared to the much wider area evidenced by fossil remains, it is thought the species was already in decline before this time. The blue antelope was hunted to extinction by European settlers, Hinrich Lichtenstein claimed that the last bluebuck was shot in 1799 or 1800. The antelope was the first large African mammal to become extinct in historical times.

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STAR**** **OOP**S: Surreal Space Poetry – Page 46

surreal space poetry

Please fight
Get back
Now I am sure
This happened.

Completely flanked
Working alone
Weaker then
Finished off.

Fast
To the ground,
Through the air.
Fight!

End? End.

I doubt.

StarOops
The fog of war, the confusion of destruction, the madness of adrenaline

Big Eared Hopping Mouse – It Was Very Good

Big Eared Hopping Mouse
Not the Big Eared Hopping Mouse, Unknown

Big Eared Hopping Mouse (Notomys macrotis)

The big eared hopping mouse was a small rodent resembling a tiny kangaroo about the size of a rat. The mouse had large eyes and ears with a brush-tipped tail. It moved on its four legs when moving slowly or by hopping on its large, padded hind feet when moving quickly. Their habitat is believed to have been the sand dunes of Western Australia.

We only know about the Big Eared Hopping Mouse from two damaged specimens. The last record of the animal dates from July 19, 1843, and was collected in Perth around the Moore River and King George’s Sound.

There are believed to have been many contributing factors to the extinction of macrotis: the introduction of nonnative species – particularly cats; exotic diseases; habitat loss and degradation; resource depletion due to livestock and feral herbivores. The systematic destruction of their burrows, resources, food supply, and the animals themselves lead to the species’ extinction.

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Festivus 2016

Festivus 2016

Once again we find ourselves in that most joyous, and stressful, time of the year. Yes, that’s right, Saturnalia!  Keep Saturn in Saturnalia! I suppose there are some other holidays people celebrate but they’re probably fake holidays that don’t honor the Father of the Gods… I do know that Saturnalia means that Festivus is once again upon us! And, as I have for the last four years, I participated in Talking Time‘s Gift Exchange.

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