Making Restaurant Passports

What you'll need!

What you’ll need!

D and I some times have trouble deciding where to eat when we go out for dinner. There is a lot of back and forth and statements, declarations, and assertions of “not caring,” or “up for anything.” This usually dissolves into both of us shrugging our shoulders and then going to one of the three restaurants we always went to…

D is not a fan of this system.

She saw some where on-line the idea of a food passport: a small book filled with a list of the restaurants in your town and the surrounding area you want to eat at or you have not yet been to. Instead of having the same old conversation over and over you just flip open your passport and go! Not being too fond of our current system I seconded the notion of making our own. For the passports I picked up a three pack of Moleskine’s unlined chap books. Next, I used a straight edge to draw out the lines for each page of the passport. The page was divided into three parts the upper 2/3 is blank, the bottom third divided vertically for making comments or stamping once the restaurant had been frequented.

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With the passports laid out D and I next went through our town local wiki and wrote down all of the restaurants we had not yet been to and wanted to make sure we visited. The list came to 37. I didn’t think there were nearly that many restaurants in town but these were just the ones we had never been too?! With the list drawn up I sat down to start adding some charm and personality to the passports. Using crayons, remember when I bought those, I started doodling whatever came to mind when I read the names of the restaurants. I tried to portray in some way the nature of the place or the food provided there.

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Of the 37 restaurants I’ve drawn up 16 so far. There are a lot of Thai and Indian places in Davis. It is not easy to draw, using crayons, Thai or Indian food… I’m sure I’ll figure out something…

D seems pretty excited about starting to use the passports. I’ll admit I am too! Once I finish all the art and/or once start “getting visas” from the restaurants I’ll post some more pictures.

Beer of the Week 39: Union Jack IPA

Firestone Walker Brewing Company’s Union Jack India Pale Ale

From their website:

Union Jack abounds with hop aroma and character. In fact this well balanced, west coast IPA is double dry hopped, giving it more and more of the grapefruit, citrus hop aroma and flavor it is known for. Overall it utilizes over four pounds of pacific-northwest hops per barrel.

From my notes:

Coppery colored with large bubbled tan head with medium retention (about 3 or 4 minutes) and nice lacing. Citrus hoppiness on the nose with with pine in the background. Citrus and floral on the tongue, specifically  I’m tasting grapefruit. Medium bodied. The hope flavor is pretty well balanced by some malt which smooths out the hops. Mild to medium bitter finish.

Another IPA! IPAs have a robust flavor profile and need to be paired with food with similarly strong flavors. Think spicy foods, bold cheeses, robust cheeses. Thai food is great here, as would be macaroni and cheese  with some good blue cheeses.

Rating (out of five):

Beer of the Week 38: Red Seal Ale

North Coast Brewing Company’s Ruedrich’s Red Seal Ale

From the bottle:

Malt & hops are beautifully married in this copper-red pale ale. Generously hopped for a long, spicy denouement. Water, malted barley, hops, yeast & that’s all.

From my notes:

Pinkish rose colored beer with a thick tan head. Smells of malt and hops hints of cherry. Tastes of hops and citrus. Too much bitter on the finish. Very smooth to drink.

It looks pretty in the tulip glass. Though I think ale’s just go into pint glasses.

 

Considering how much I enjoy North Coast Brewing Company’s other beers Ruedrich’s was a let down. It’s a perfectly serviceable Red but seeing how their other beers were so much more than ‘serviceable…’  I need to learn to not let my expectations spoil a beer. Red Ale’s go well with chicken, seafood, and ground beef. A little spice won’t hurt either!

Rating (out of five):

Beer of the Week 37 Lagunitas Pils

Lagunitas’ PILS

From their website:

Czech Style Pilsner. Like Adam and Eve, Issac and Ishmael,Mao and Confuscious, Good and Evil, Day and Night, Hittites and Visigoths, John and Lorena, or Groucho and Moe, Ales and Lagers are as different as can be. Still, we must love each other for who they are, seperately but equally, with liberty, and justice, for all. Cheers!

From my notes:

 Wheat coloring very clear beer. Thin white head. grain, grass, and malt on the nose maybe a hint of citrus. Crisp, crisp finish. medium hop aftertaste. good example of a Pilsner.

It’s a thing of beauty, no?

Pilsners are   fairly light on the alcohol (4.5 to 5.5% ab. They pair really well with lighter foods: chicken (okay to spice it up), sandwiches, and seafoods. Or you can just drink them unaccompanied.

Rating (our of five):